5 Reasons Why Learning About Weather at an Early Age Is Important

January 19, 2018 , In: Lifestyle tips , With: No Comments
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As a parent, one of the most rewarding things is when you see your children start their earliest educational endeavors by interacting with the surrounding world. While reading and rudimentary arithmetic are standard parts of early learning, you might want to consider including a basic weather curriculum in your efforts. Earth Networks works with teachers to incorporate meteorological concepts into STEM lesson plans, but here are five reasons you should start earlier.

 

  1. You can start cultivating an interest in science by teaching concepts backed up by evidence that can be seen through the window.
  2. An early understanding of how Earth’s climate works can help your kids become aware of their impact on the environment.
  3. Knowledge of weather conditions could reduce anxiety that often accompanies thunderstorms and other severe events.
  4. Meteorology is the beginning of understanding other concepts such as agriculture and food production.
  5. Early meteorological knowledge can help children stay safe by encouraging preparedness and understanding of rapidly changing conditions.

 

Start Small and Work Upward

Don’t stress about teaching your children complicated concepts, as your early efforts should focus on answers to basic questions such as how rain works or why it’s cold during the winter. Take your child outside and point out clouds to illustrate the precipitation cycle. If you’d like to take things a step further, consider installing weather alert software on your computer so your kids can see patterns unfolding in real time.

 

Start Teaching Today

 Now you know about the importance of weather education, you can start figuring out ways to start teaching your children as soon as possible. These concepts aren’t only for parents, as preschool and kindergarten teachers can also find ways to teach about climate and precipitation. If you’re an educator who’d like to start using meteorology as part of your STEM curriculum, contact Earth Networks online or by calling 800-544-4429 today.

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